Tag Archives: Climate Change

United Nations Climate Change Conference Cancun 2010

The 2010 United Nations Climate Change Conference will be held in Cancún, Mexico, from 29 November to 10 December 2010. The conference is officially referred to as the 16th session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 16) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the 6th session of the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties (CMP 6) to the Kyoto Protocol.

For Updates: http://cc2010.mx/en/

United Nations Climate Change Conference in Tianjin China

The 2010 UN Climate change conference starts today in Tianjin China. Last years summit in Copenhagen was for all practical purposes a failure, for it did not reach a consensus on how to work together to reduce the human impact on global climate.

45,000 people traveled from around the world convinced of the need for new global agreement on climate change.  After a week of talk and more talk, every one left with nothing concrete decided.Environmental groups hoping for something substantial were left wanting and wondering what went wrong.

Last year it was estimated that between 2009 and 2020, global emissions are likely to rise by 10-20%, and the chances of temperatures rising by 3C by 2100 are greater than 50%.

According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), this implies a range of serious impacts for the world, including

  • significant falls in crop yields across most of the world
  • damage to most coral reefs
  • likely disruption to water supplies for hundreds of millions of people.

This year’s meeting again aims for the following:

  • Industrialized nations’ commitments under the Kyoto Protocol, including further emission reductions after 2012, when the current period ends.
  • Preparation of a draft negotiating text for the Cancun summit. (Focusing on what is achievable in Cancun and muster political compromises that will deliver what needs to be done)

Ratifying the Kyoto protocol would mean reduction of emissions substantially by the developed nations, developing nations will not step up and take charge unless the developed nations lead the way in action not talk.

We are the ones who contribute to climate change and it is up to us to make sure we take the steps to make a positive impact. The Climate change conference is a coming together of the leaders of all nations large and small to sit down and discuss ways we can as one world start healing what we created. The onus falls on the developed nations to take the first step and show by example that a change in ways is possible.

I quote Mahatma Gandhi “You must be the change you wish to see in the world.” One can not say for sure what will be the out come of this summit either, yet we hope like always that one day the people of the world will come together and make amends for what they have done to the earth. Hoping it will happen sooner than later. Change is a must and it will have to happen.

You can follow the UN Climate change Conference in Tianjin HERE

BBC Article about the conference HERE

Reuters Article – Climate talks put top emitter China in hot seat

September 16th World Ozone Day

Today is the World Ozone day, on 19th December 1994 the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 16 September the International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer, commemorating the date, in 1987, on which the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer was signed. This commemoration around the world offers an opportunity to focus attention and action at the global, regional and national levels on the protection of the ozone layer. All Member States are invited to devote this special day to promotion, at the national level, of concrete activities in accordance with the objectives and goals of the Montreal Protocol and its Amendment.

If you grew up in the 80’s and 90’s you might have heard about the hole in the Ozone layer. Which incidentally is not actually a hole, but an area in the ozone layer where ozone has been severely depleted; thereby allowing sun rays to pass through without much absorption or reflection. Each year for the past few decades during the Southern Hemisphere spring, chemical reactions involving chlorine and bromine cause ozone in the southern polar region to be destroyed rapidly and severely. The world reacted to this pretty much united by removing chloro-flouro carbons or CFC’s from spray cans, refrigerants etc. And the hole in the Ozone layer has been shrinking since 2006. By the end of 2009, the Montreal Protocol had resulted in the elimination of over 98 per cent of historical levels of ozone-depleting substances.

You can keep track of it on the NASA Website here.

Ozone Hole on the 12th of September 2010

Picture Courtesy NASA

The 2009 UN Climate Change Conference was held in Copenhagen on 16th September 2009 with the slogan “power Green Growth, Protect the Planet”. Countries agreed to work towards a common, long-term goal to limit global temperature rise to below 2° Celsius.

Climate Change and Actions to slow the Human impact

Climate change and global warming are divisive issues for many people still who remain skeptics in spite of what is happening around them. In some cases the belief is religious while in others it makes it easier to explain away our own reckless behaviors by putting it all on nature. Either way the reality is that there are visible changes happening all over the world from receding glaciers to mistimed monsoons, droughts etc… to stronger hurricane seasons.

Climate change is recognized as a major environmental problem facing our planet. Evidence is building that impacts are being felt in the form of melting icecaps in the polar areas and increased variability of temperature, rainfall and storms in virtually all regions.

Developed countries committed to establish and implement targets for greenhouse gas emissions, and a number of developing countries, including major emerging economies, agreed to implement nationally appropriate mitigation actions and to communicate their efforts every two years.

Countries also agreed on the importance of acting to Reduce emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD), and to provide support for the most vulnerable to cope with climate change.

To support these priorities, countries pledged up to $30 billion a year for developing countries between 2010 and 2012, to be disbursed through a Copenhagen Green Climate Fund.

Countries also backed the goal of mobilizing $100 billion a year by 2020.

Environmental facts from the UNEP

  • Forests cover 30 percent of the planet’s total land area. The total forested area in 2005 was just under 4 billion hectares, at least one third less than before the dawn of agriculture, some 10,000 years ago.
  • The ten most forest-rich countries, which account for two-thirds of the total forested area, are the Russian Federation, Brazil, Canada, the United States, China, Australia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Indonesia, Peru and India.
  • Six million hectares of primary forest are lost every year due to deforestation and modification through selective logging and other human interventions. More than one-third of all forests are primary forests, defined as forests where there are no clearly visible indications of human activity and where ecological processes are not significantly disturbed.
  • Primary forests shelter diverse animal and plant species, and culturally diverse indigenous people, with deep connections to their habitat.
  • Only 20 per cent of the world’s forests remain in large intact areas. These forests consist of tropical rain forests, mangrove, coastal and swamp forests. Monsoon and deciduous forests flourish in the drier and more mountainous regions.
  • Trees quite literally form the foundations of many natural systems. They help to conserve soil and water, control avalanches, prevent desertification, protect coastal areas and stabilize sand dunes.
  • Forests are the most important repositories of terrestrial biological biodiversity, housing up to 90 per cent of known terrestrial species.
  • Forest animals have a vital role in forest ecology such as pollination, seed dispersal and germination.
  • Trees absorb carbon dioxide and are vital carbon sinks.
  • It is estimated that the world’s forests store 283 Gigatonnes of carbon in their biomass alone, and that carbon stored in forest biomass, deadwood, litter and soil together is roughly 50 per cent more than the carbon in the atmosphere.
  • Carbon in forest biomass decreased in Africa, Asia and South America in the period 1990–2005. For the world as a whole, carbon stocks in forest biomass decreased annually by 1.1 Gigatonne of carbon (equivalent to 4 billion 25kg sacks of charcoal).
  • The loss of natural forests around the world contributes more to global emissions each year than the transport sector.
  • World population currently stands at 6.5 billion people. It is projected to grow to 9 billion by 2042.  The expansion of agricultural and industrial needs, population growth, poverty, landlessness and consumer demand are the major driving forces behind deforestation.
  • Most deforestation is due to conversion of forests to agricultural land. Global removals of wood for timber and fuel amounted to 3.1 billion cubic metres in 2005.
  • Worldwide, deforestation continues at an alarming rate, about 13 million hectares per year, an area the size of Greece or Nicaragua.
  • Africa and South America have the largest net loss of forests. In Africa it is estimated that nearly half of the forest loss was due to removal of wood fuel.
  • Forests in Europe are expanding. Asia, which had a net loss in the 1990s, reported a net gain of forests in the past five years, primarily due to large-scale forestation in China.
  • Eighty per cent of the world’s forests are publicly owned, but private ownership is on the rise, especially in North and Central America and in Oceania.
  • About 11 per cent of the world’s forests are designated for the conservation of biological diversity. These areas are mainly, but not exclusively, in protected areas.
  • Around 10 million people are employed in conventional forest management and conservation. Formal employment in forestry declined by about 10 per cent from 1990 to 2000.

The theme for the celebration is “Ozone layer protection: governance and compliance at their best”.  Governments world over are encouraged to create programs or events to raise public awareness of the importance of protecting the ozone layer for present and future generations. These can include workshops, press conferences, competitions in schools, and university lectures by experts. The list of programs as conducted by different countries will be listed on the UNEP website.

Check out how countries world over are celebrating the World Ozone Day HERE

Sources for details – UNEP website

This is the symbolic representation of a ton of CO2 from the Copenhagen summit of 2009.

Check out Seal the Deal – website of the 2009 December UN Climate change meeting in Copenhagen

10/10/10 The Global Work Party

Mark Your Calendars 10/10/2010 is “Global Work Party”

Place – Where ever You Live

Aim – Do something to alleviate Climate Change in your city or community.

Watch the world come together to take a stand against climate change, do your part every small step counts.

On 10/10/2010 350.org is organizing the Global work Party, the largest ever effort on one day to reduce carbon world wide. The plan is to get people to work towards doing one thing to reduce our carbon foot print be it by installing Solar panels or by fixing up bikes. People have already started responding in large numbers and are creating action plans for their respective, cities and towns.

What is 350.org?

“350 “comes from the 350 parts per million which many scientists, climate experts, and progressive national governments are now saying is the safe upper limit for CO2 in our atmosphere. It is an international campaign organization dedicated to that’s building a movement to unite the world around solutions to the climate crisis–the solutions that science and justice demand.

The ultimate aim of the organization is to make governments world over to pass strong climate change policies and work to reduce emissions.

Why Global Work Party?

Thousands of people around the world have already registered their plans, including bike repair workshops in San Francisco, school insulating teams in London, waste-land-to-veggies-gardeners in  New Zealand, and solar panel installers in Kenya. Check out if your city or neighborhood has something planned? If not plan something and get moving. You can find ideas and existing plans here

So the plan is to pay attention to both “Work” and “Party”, people who care about the earth coming together is a party and when work is being done to reduce our impact on the planet what could be better!

Do your bit, Join the Global Work Party and take a step towards making our world a better place. Live Green!

Check out the video on Global Work Party:

You can sign up to host a local event at www.350.org/oct10

Search for an event to join at www.350.org/map

National Geographic’s List Of 10 Things To Save The Ocean

National Geographic has a list of 10 things which each and everyone of us can adapt and which will help in saving our oceans!You can read the deatiled list HERE A pictorial representation of the tips is below 🙂

1. Mind our Carbon Footprint and Reduce Energy Consumption

2. Make Sustainable Educated Seafood Choices

3. Use Fewer Plastic Products

4. Help keep Beaches Clean, the trash on the beach invariably makes it to the Ocean

5. Don’t purchase products that exploit Marine Life.

6. Be An Ocean Friendly Pet owner – choosing pet food and litter responsibly. Also being aware of what fish to buy for your aquarium.

7. Support Organizations Working to Protect the Ocean

8. Influence Change in Your Community. VOTE – GREEN

9. Travel the Ocean Responsibly

10. Educate Yourself About Oceans and Marine Life
All life on Earth is connected to the ocean and its inhabitants.

Check out this Video from the BBC about the threat faced by the shallow waters and the Coral Reefs:

Public Interest Wild Life Ads

Advertising, in its non-commercial guise, is a powerful educational tool capable of reaching and motivating large audiences. “Advertising justifies its existence when used in the public interest—it is much too powerful a tool to use solely for commercial purposes.” Attributed to Howard Gossage by David Ogilvy. (Source Wikipedia)

 

Nature Cant Be Recycled

 

What will it take before we respect the planet ?

 

Deforestation

 

Stop Climate Change

 

Deforestation-Lungs

 

Poaching

 

Global Warming

 

Fur Trade

“The Black Rhino” Not Really Black

“What do a Rhino, a child suffering from a fever in China and a rich man in Yemen have in common? “

To find the answer you will have to either learn about the Black Rhinoceros (meaning read my blog) or scroll all the way down 🙂

Well now you know our weekly earthling for this week is a Rhino! When I heard the Rhino we have at the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium is a Black Rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) I wondered why it did not look Black to me! Then I learned Black was not the color of the rhino but was given to distinguish it from the “White” rhino which incidentally is not white (Funny Humans!!) but was derived from the Dutch word for “wide”! So Black and White Rhinos really can’t be distinguished by the color of their skin (as both look pretty much Grey!!) but by the upper lip; it is prehensile and pointed in the Black Rhino while it is wide in the white rhino.

The Black Rhino is a critically endangered species as a result of Poaching and habitat fragmentation. Relentless hunting of the species and clearances of land for settlement and agriculture resulted in the population being reduced from a probable several hundred thousand at the start of the century, to less than 2,500 by the early 1990s (the minimum population estimate in 1995 was approximately 2,410 (Emslie and Brooks 1999). Historically they were found all over Africa; South of the Sahara except the Congo Basin, from grass lands to deserts, tropical and subtropical. Now their range has been fragmented to Cameroon Kenya and South Africa.

Black Rhinos are herbivores and are solitary except during mating season, with a gestation period of 15 months and the female giving birth to a solitary calf. Offspring are weaned after 18months and are dependent on the mother for up to 4years! They generally stay within 25kilometers from a water source. Dominant males are extremely territorial and will fight any intruder. They are more active during the mornings and evenings and rest during mid day when it is really hot.

Lifespan is between 30-35 years in the wild and they live to be above 45 in captivity. They weigh between 1750 to 3000 pounds! They have 2 horns with the front one being longer. The Rhino skin is 1.5 to 2 centimeters thick and wallowing in mud helps protect them from insects and the sun!

Some Interesting Rhino facts:

  • Rhinos inhabited not just Africa and Asia but Europe and North America as well! No one knows why they disappeared from North America.
  • At present there are 5 species of Rhinos in the world; The Black, White, Indian, Javan and Sumatran.
  • All together they number around 24,000 in the wild with 1200 in captivity.
  • Throughout the 20th Century the Black Rhino was the most numerous of the world’s rhino species!
  • Their Numbers in the wild dropped by a whopping 90% in around 40 plus years!!
  • The Javan Rhinoceros is the most endangered large mammal species in the world!
  • The oldest Rhino in captivity was 49 years old.
  • Adult black rhinos defecate on dung piles as a means of communication, as it reveals to other rhinos how recently an individual was in a certain location.
  • Rhinos have poor eye sight (see up to 25-30 meters away) and rely on their sense of smell most.
  • Male rhinos do fight over territories and use their anterior horns in the fight very effectively.
  • Two countries have shown net increases in numbers of Black Rhino over the period 1980-2007: South Africa and Namibia, from estimated 630+300 in 1980 (Emslie and Brooks 1999) to 1,470 + 1,390, respectively in 2007 (AfRSG data 2008).
  • Rhino horn has two main consumers: traditional use in Chinese medicine, and ornamental use (for example, rhino horn is a highly prized material for making ornately carved handles for ceremonial daggers (Jambiyas) worn in some Middle East countries mostly Yemen).
  • About 90 percent of adult rhino deaths are caused by poaching.
  • Like the elephant, the rhino walks on its tip toes. The round heels of its feet are actually fatty tissue.
  • A rhino can run 25 to 30 mph for short distances.
  • In their native countries they are threatened because their horns are worth more than gold to the poachers.
  • The rhino’s horn is made of keratin the same stuff that makes up our hair and fingernails.
  • The black and white rhinoceros remain so closely related that they can still mate and successfully produce offspring.

What can be done to make sure that this beautiful species stays where it has for millions of years? We can support the organizations which are doing the needful to negate the issues plaguing these animals like The international Rhino Foundation or the IUCN OR you could go shopping follow this link to know how?

Another thing one can do is educating people to why some of the traditional believes are just not true and how there can be alternatives for those ways. May be sooner rather than later, people will awake to the plight of their fellow earthlings; who I believe have an equal right to live on this planet as we do.

Live Green!

An Indian Rhino who lost its horns to poachers.. what a shame… 

 

Sources:

The IUCN Red Data List For the map and info

The Wikipedia for the awesome Picture

The Columbus Zoo and Aquarium my favorite zoo 🙂

The Rhino Resource Center

Answer to the Riddle : Must be evident by now if not here it goes

They all think that the horn of the rhino is very valuable. To the rhino, it is very valuable because it uses its horn to defend itself and to fight other males when looking for a mate. Its sharp horn is a pretty dangerous weapon, and, if it breaks off, it will grow back. For the Child in China it could be part of a traditional medicine for fever( horn proven not to be medicinal) and the man in Yemen thinks the Rhino’s horn adds to his status on the handle of his dagger (Jambiya).”

Climate Change and Major Vegetation Shifts

According to a new analysis vegetation around the world is on the move, and climate change is the culprit. The study of global vegetation shifts was led by a University of California, Berkeley, ecologist in collaboration with researchers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service.

Credit: Map by Patrick Gonzalez et al

Researchers present evidence that over the past century, vegetation has been gradually moving toward the poles and up mountain slopes, where temperatures are cooler, as well as toward the equator, where rainfall is greater and an estimated one-tenth to one-half of the land mass on Earth will be highly vulnerable to climate-related vegetation shifts by the end of this century, depending upon how effectively humans are able to curb greenhouse gas emissions.

Approximately one billion people now live in areas that are highly to very highly vulnerable to future vegetation shifts,” said the study’s lead author Patrick Gonzalez, a visiting scholar at the Center for Forestry at UC Berkeley’s College of Natural Resources. “Ecosystems provide important services to people, so we must reduce the emissions that cause climate change, then adapt to major changes that might occur.”

Read more from Science Daily website.

Thumbnail Credit: Tomas Rotger

Celebrating The Environment

Happy World Environment Day 2010

 

Happy WED2010! Wondering what WED stands for? June 5th is the day United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) Celebrates the World Environment Day – WED! It has been observed on 5th June since 1972, WED is one of the principal mediums through which the UN motivates worldwide awareness of the environment and encourages political attention and action.

Why is the Environment on the front page these days? It is not about just the oil spill, or deforestation, or climate change alone… it is about all of these and more, it about the quality of life on our planet, it is about taking small steps and making a difference. UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon says Although individual decisions may seem small in the face of global threats and trends, when billions of people join forces in common purpose, we can make a tremendous difference.”

It is estimated that we share the world with around 5 million plus species of which only around 2 million have been identified. It is also estimated that around 35 species go extinct every day just in the rainforests. Why is there such a rapid deterioration around us? Winters are colder, summers warmer, droughts and floods abound and other natural disasters too…

Scientists have found that in Earth’s history before the Industrial Revolution, Earth’s climate changed due to natural cause’s not related to human activity. These natural causes are still in play today, but their influence is too small or they occur too slowly to explain the rapid warming seen in recent decades. So for something that we have contributed to in creating is it not our responsibility to make amends?

So this WED day take your own small step, does not matter how small you think it is, it will make a difference.

A list of things one can incorporate in everyday life easily:

  1. Plant a tree! Help achieve UNEP’s Billion Tree Campaign target of planting seven billion trees – one for every person on the planet! Let us start one by one…
  2. Use cold water for washing clothes and a laundry line with air drying helps too!
  3. In Summer leaving the windows open is a good way to get some fresh air and also help with your carbon footprint by not using the A/C. When you really feel the need to switch on the A/C use a fan with it to spread the cold air around more effectively.
  4. When cooking match the size of your pan to the heating element and use a lid, lowers energy wastage.
  5. Don’t throw your jeans into the hamper after a day’s use unless it is really dirty, lesser times you use the laundry the more efficient your use of water!
  6. For washing use eco-friendly products, helps the environment and if you have the space plant a tree J
  7. Plants are the best air purifiers, add to the beauty of your room and also help to clean the air! Green at its best!
  8. Turn off all unnecessary lights and remove idle chargers plugged in to the sockets when not in use, will save you up to 25% on your power usage.
  9. All PC’s Laptops, Printers etc have a power saver option (look for the Energy star) and turn them off at the end of the day!
  10. While printing (if you really need to print it out) print on both sides; it helps save trees!
  11. You are a coffee drinker like I am? Take your favorite mug to work, that way you won’t be using non-biodegradable cups. What a way to be Green!
  12. If you get stuck in traffic a lot, consider turning off your engine if you will be idling for long periods of time.
  13. Did you know cruise control on straight roads is fuel efficient!
  14. Keep a few cloth tote bags in your car for use whenever you want to buy something.
  15. Go vegan once a week at least, producing meat releases loads of greenhouse gases.
  16. Using an electric or hand razor with replaceable blades is GREEN, avoid disposable ones as it adds to landfills.
  17. It would seem like the most normal thing to do, but many of us forget that we can save water in simple ways like not letting the tap run while shaving, washing your face, or brushing your teeth you can save up to 200 gallons of water a month.
  18. Drinking tap water when safe is a better choice than bottled water and those plastic water bottles.
  19. Making green food choices also has global consequences. Buying local means supporting the local economy and reducing the greenhouse gas emissions required to get food from its origin to your plate.
  20. Buy things you need not want. Reducing consumption be it of oil or anything else helps in reducing our carbon footprint.

The Earth is like a large breathing and feeling living-being, every small step each of us takes good or not affects one and all. I truly believe we are all connected to each other and to the earth, so what I do every day has to be thoughtful so as to not hurt another.

I start my day by remembering this Native American saying (well it is the first thing I see every day :)) “We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors, we borrow it from our children.”

Remember the 3R’s Reduce, Reuse and Recycle! Every Day is Earth Day! Have a Green WED 2010 day!! Live Green! and yeah Don’t forget to plant the TREE 🙂

Polar Bears Cute Cuddly Strong and Threatened

 
Polar Bear
Image by Spisharam

Starting our journey to know more about our fellow earthlings with the Polar bear Ursus maritimus since it has become the poster child for climate change. Volunteering at the Columbus Zoo has helped me learn a lot more about animals than I did when I graduated with a degree in zoology (mostly me paying more attention to the animal rather than the science I should say). This month the zoo opened its Polar frontier to the public and it has been an instant hit with one and all!

It is during the introduction to the Polar frontier and preparing to talk about them and answer questions that I realized how much things have changed for them and how much things are still changing.

At first look they look white and cuddly (like all the teddy bears in the world!). Ursus maritimus Polar Bears are the world’s largest land predators. They evolved from the brown bears 200,000 years ago. They have adaptations to live in the cold arctic climate they call home. Polar bears live in the circumpolar north (meaning inside the Arctic Circle on northern most parts of our earth) and hunt for seals their main food source through cracks in ice called “leads”. Approximate Polar bear population in the wild is believed to be between 20,000 and 25,000 as of 2008. Polar bears live up to 25 years in the wild and 40 years at zoos. Polar bears have huge paws with sickle shaped claws which help them walk on ice without slipping. Size wise the males are larger standing between 8-10 feet as adults and weighing between 550-1,700 pounds (approximately 250-770 K g) females stand between 6-8 feet full grown and weigh between 200-700 pounds (90-320 K g). Polar bears have solid insulation for surviving the Arctic climate (temperatures dip to -50°F / -45°C). They have 2 layers of fur and a layer of blubber which can be 4.5 inches thick!

The female bears after mating and feeding heavily in April and May dig a den along mountain slopes or snowdrifts (moving snow accumulating along slopes, kind of like sand dunes in the deserts) in October or early November.  The Mother bears give birth to mostly twin cubs during November or December.  The cubs are 12-14 inches when born and weigh around a pound. They grow feeding on their mother’s rich milk. The Mother bear and cubs do not emerge from the den until March April, and the mother bear does not eat, drink or defecate during this whole time! Once out of the den in March – April she heads out looking for a seal to hunt and eat and thus starts the cubs first lesson in real life survival. She teaches them to hunt by targeting seal pups which are still in their den. The cubs stay with the mom for up to 2 years.

Fun Facts:

  • Five nations are home to polar bears in the wild: Canada (where almost 60% of them live), U.S. (Alaska), Russia, Denmark (Greenland), and Norway.
  • Polar Bear cubs below the age of 1 are called coys.
  • They are the largest land predators and the only predator they have is the Human!
  • The largest Polar bear on record was a 2,209 pound male!
  • They are so powerful they can capture and drag a seal weighing between 150-200 pounds from water on to the ice!
  • They pretty much eat anything they want (real Omnivores), but Ringed Seals are their favorite food.
  • Polar bears only eat the blubber in the seals they kill and leave the rest behind for other carnivores to feed on, like the Arctic foxes.
  • They are the top most predator in the Arctic food chain, and keep the seal population under control.
  • They have one of the slowest birth-rates amongst mammals, having only 5 litters in their lifetime.
  • Most Polar bears spend most of their life on the ice and exception is the Western Hudson Bay population which spends most of its time on land while not hunting to stay cool and conserve energy.

Conservation

Polar bears depend on ice for livelihood – they breed, hunt and even build their maternity dens on ice! Increasing global temperature has lead to the ice melting faster than normal. Their time has been reduced by around 3 weeks than what they had 20 years ago. If the climate change is not brought under control scientists believe two thirds of the population could disappear by 2030 i.e. in 20 years!

Rapid loss of sea ice is the major threat to the Polar Bear. Watch the Receding ice video courtesy Polar Bear International

Their population is also impacted by poaching, pollution and industrial impact. If not properly regulated hunting could also join the list.

Climate change affects not just us but the effect is wide spread, it is time we take a stand. Every small step counts. Live Green, Leave the Earth better for the future.

Polar Bear at the Columbus Zoo

For more information Polar Bears International Website