Tag Archives: environment friendly

Nokero N200 A Green Solution to Light Up Nights Worldover

In a world where 1 in 4 humans lives without access to electricity, and you and I pretty much can’t exist without it an economically viable solution to light up the nights is a blessing, no less. Nokero N200 is a small and effective solution for a large problem! Nokero (No kerosene!) was formed in June 2010 by inventor Steve Katsaros to develop safe and environmentally-friendly solar products that eliminate the need for harmful and polluting fuels used for light and heat around the world and most importantly, are affordable to the communities that need them.

Nokero Introduction

Nokero lamps are an all-in-one solar system that is already completely and successfully replacing kerosene lamps and paraffin candles in places all around the world where  electricity is not a given. Best of all, their lighting products are more economical than any other lights of the same kind.

Nokero performance:

  • A typical kerosene lamp emits about 10 lumens of light, similar to Nokero.
  • Nokero is made in a high-quality factory, has its CE certification, and is built to last 5+years when properly cared for.
  • Nokero’s battery lasts 2-3 years, and is replaceable for about $1 US.
  • Nokero is bulb-shaped, so it’s easy to identify what it is and how it works – anyone can use it.
  • Pivot technology allows for maximum efficiency – the solar panel can pivot toward the sun to increase insolation rates.
  •  The most affordable solar light of its kind
  • Quality design and construction
  • The best commercially available solar panels
  • High-temperature battery works efficiently in all climates

About Worldwide Kerosene Use

  • A quarter of humanity still obtains illumination via fuel-based lighting, usually Kerosene or “Kero”.
  • Usage is expected to shrink only slightly by 2030 (from 1.6 billion in 2006 to 1.3 billion in 2030), and is on the rise in Sub-Saharan Africa.
  • Fuel lighting is widespread in well over 100 countries.
  • Typical kerosene users burn their lamps for 1.5 hours a night
  • The Nokero N100 lasts about 2 hours a night on one day’s charge.
  • The Nokero N200 lasts 6-plus hours a night on one day’s charge.

 

Economics:

  • The average user spends 5% of their income on lighting fuel.
  • Off-grid lighting users spend $40 billion per year (about 20% of all global lighting expenditures) yet receive only 0.1% of total lighting services.
  • Nokero pays for itself within weeks or months (depending on region) when replacing a kerosene lamp.
  • Recent market research has shown these users’ willingness to pay $6-$15 for solar LED products.
  • Better light creates improved study conditions, leading to a better overall economy for the host nation. (One report stated that study time of students rose from 1.47 hours to 2.71 hours per day, with a positive effect on school performance, when using LED lighting rather than fuel lamp lighting).
  • Off-grid businesses rank “improved lighting” highest among a set of improvements desired for their premises.
  • Those who buy a product take more care of it than those who are given a product.
  • Traditional solar home systems cost $300 or more and require installation.
  • Typical “hurricane” lanterns cost about $5US in most regions.
  • Battery-powered LED flashlights are available in some areas for about $5, but 87% of users had problems within 6 months.

Health:

  • Inhalation of fumes from fuel lamps is equivalent to smoking 40 cigarettes a day.
  • Exposure to single-wick lamps exposes user to 10 times more particulate matter (PM) than ambient health guidelines.
  • More than 1 million people per year die in fires started by fuel-lamps and lighting materials.
  • Indoor air pollution is responsible for the death of 1.6 million people every year—that’s one death every 20 seconds.
  • Long-term inhalation of hydrocarbons, including kerosene fumes, results in central nervous system damage, including loss of cognitive functions, gait disturbances, and loss of coordination.
  • Other health risks include burns, complications from fires or explosions, child poisoning because of inadvertent consumption, exposure to unburned fuel, and compromised ‘visual health’ because of sub-standard luminance levels.

Environment:

  • 1.3 million Barrels of oil per day consumed by fuel lighting.
  • 190 million tons of carbon dioxide released into atmosphere.
  • This is the equivalent of 30m cars.
  • One Nokero bulb can save 0.77 tons of CO2 during its lifetime.
  • Other fuels:
  • Kerosene is not the only fuel used for light.
  • More than 7% of households in Tanzania burn wood for light.
  •  20% of homes in Ethiopia burn biofuels (non-kerosene) for light.

Kerosene facts and information are sourced from The Lumina Project

Nokero N200 is the latest from Nokero and is a simple easy to use solution for most lighting issues at home or while camping.

Some interesting facts:

In most countries, the Nokero N200 pays for itself in 15 days to 2 months by eliminating the need for expensive candles or kerosene.

The Nokero N200 also makes an ideal camping light, or a portable RV light, emergency light, or marine light.

It brings 6 hours of light per night on “low” and 2.5 hours of light per night on “high”,* but it can be charged for multiple days in a row to extend its lighting time.

The battery will last for 1.5 years, and can be replaced to keep the bulb lasting for years.

Energy production and distribution has been a costly and polluting exercise world over. We all await a day when renewable energy can be produced in a cost effective way so that the nights will be lit world over.  Nokero N200 is a step in the right way for more details and to buy check out  Nokero N200

 

The Green Car of 2011 Chevy VOLT

In early November 2010 the Chevy volt was picked as the Green Car for 2011 by the Green Car Journal. General Motors showcased the Chevrolet Volt with major fanfare at the Detroit Auto show of 2007 as a concept car, and as promised kept the launch date of end of 2010. When the Chevy Volt debuted in the Los Angeles Auto show it also won the “Car of the Year” – a first for a plug in Hybrid! This year the nominees including two hybrids, a high efficiency gasoline hatchback, and for the first time two electric cars.

The automotive press loves handing out awards, but this one is somewhat relevant because all the cars considered are practical, eco-friendly vehicles you might actually want to drive. Judges include gearheads Jay Leno and Carroll Shelby along with greenies like Frances Beinecke of the Natural Resources Defense Council. Motor Trend and Automobile magazines named the Chevrolet Volt “car of the year” earlier this week.

Chevy Volt via Wikipedia

Chevy Volt via Wikipedia

It is already on the roads in many parts of the country. The Volt looks pretty average from the outside except for the grille, but the interiors and its technology are revolutionary. The Volt charges up for a range of about 40 miles on battery power only; then the gasoline engine allows another 300 miles or so on top of that. It can be plugged in to a wall socket or a special garage recharger to “refuel”. To me it seems a tad too pricey at $40k plus.

I remember a line I read about the Volt when it first made its debut as the future of GM- the author of that article said “For GM, the Volt is meant to help change its image as a vendor or SUVs and other trucks, while giving it important technical know-how in fuel-efficient cars.” You can read the entire article here In many ways it is kind of a resurrection for the American Auto makers who were caught napping by the Japanese and other auto manufacturers in the race for a fuel efficient hybrid.

After all these good things today morning I read a rating from the ACEEE on the Green Car Book website – they have rated the Chevy Volt the lowest amongst Green cars at 48! They judge the new models on a point scale that includes not only fuel economy and tailpipe emissions, but also such relatively arcane measures as factory pollution and ease of recycling. At first glance I wondered what changed? then realized it was just how they were looking at it skewed. The volt’s gas engine gives a mileage of 35 mpg city/40 highway, which is nothing to write home about really. But what they have not taken into account is the fact that many a volt owner might never use the gas engine! and the Volt was given a 10/10 for being green by th car connection folks too!

Motor Trend magazine said“The genius of the Volt’s powertrain is that it is actually capable of operating as a pure EV, a series hybrid, or as a parallel hybrid to deliver the best possible efficiency, depending on the user’s duty cycle. For want of a better technical descriptor, this is world’s first intelligent hybrid. And the investment in the technology that drives this car is also an investment in the long-term future of automaking in America.”

I for one am very intrigued and would definitely take a look at the Volt before I decide as to which new car to buy, will just have to wait for the price to reach a little lower 🙂

CHECK OUT:

Car connection for a Review of the Chevrolet Volt

Forbes article on the Green Car Books low rating

OAT Shoes: Biodegradable Shoes

OATS Shoes

From the OAT Shoe Website “OAT Shoes is a brand-new initiative in shoe design combining attractive style and biodegradable materials to produce sneakers that not only look good, but leave no mark on the environment when you throw them out.”

OAT shoes are made using hemp, cork, bio-cotton, certified biodegradable plastics, chlorine-free bleach and other nontoxic materials, the shoes are designed to completely break down when buried in the ground

The prices of the shoes are not yet announced and initially they will be available only in Europe.

OAT Shoes Website : http://www.oatshoes.com/

Green Super Cars At Paris Auto Show

Carbon conscious and environment friendly people who loves cars can cheer. Auto makes went bold and displayed Green Super Cars at the Paris Auto Show. The term green doesn’t mean these 200+ MPH cars will suddenly see 50mpg numbers. The idea is to employ foward-thinking technology that will eventually trickle down to a green car for daily use. This is why supercars are so important.

jaguar_c-x75

The Green Supercars that were displayed are Porsche 911 GT3 electric hybrid and Jaguar C-X75.

Porsche 911 GT3 uses a 480HP flat-six gasoline engine for the rear wheels and twin 60 kW motors for the front.

Jaguar C-X75 have four 195HP electric motors at each of the wheels, powered by an extended range . Jaguar claims the vehicle can go 68 miles on battery power alone

Read More at CrunchGear.com

CNET

September 16th World Ozone Day

Today is the World Ozone day, on 19th December 1994 the United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 16 September the International Day for the Preservation of the Ozone Layer, commemorating the date, in 1987, on which the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer was signed. This commemoration around the world offers an opportunity to focus attention and action at the global, regional and national levels on the protection of the ozone layer. All Member States are invited to devote this special day to promotion, at the national level, of concrete activities in accordance with the objectives and goals of the Montreal Protocol and its Amendment.

If you grew up in the 80’s and 90’s you might have heard about the hole in the Ozone layer. Which incidentally is not actually a hole, but an area in the ozone layer where ozone has been severely depleted; thereby allowing sun rays to pass through without much absorption or reflection. Each year for the past few decades during the Southern Hemisphere spring, chemical reactions involving chlorine and bromine cause ozone in the southern polar region to be destroyed rapidly and severely. The world reacted to this pretty much united by removing chloro-flouro carbons or CFC’s from spray cans, refrigerants etc. And the hole in the Ozone layer has been shrinking since 2006. By the end of 2009, the Montreal Protocol had resulted in the elimination of over 98 per cent of historical levels of ozone-depleting substances.

You can keep track of it on the NASA Website here.

Ozone Hole on the 12th of September 2010

Picture Courtesy NASA

The 2009 UN Climate Change Conference was held in Copenhagen on 16th September 2009 with the slogan “power Green Growth, Protect the Planet”. Countries agreed to work towards a common, long-term goal to limit global temperature rise to below 2° Celsius.

Climate Change and Actions to slow the Human impact

Climate change and global warming are divisive issues for many people still who remain skeptics in spite of what is happening around them. In some cases the belief is religious while in others it makes it easier to explain away our own reckless behaviors by putting it all on nature. Either way the reality is that there are visible changes happening all over the world from receding glaciers to mistimed monsoons, droughts etc… to stronger hurricane seasons.

Climate change is recognized as a major environmental problem facing our planet. Evidence is building that impacts are being felt in the form of melting icecaps in the polar areas and increased variability of temperature, rainfall and storms in virtually all regions.

Developed countries committed to establish and implement targets for greenhouse gas emissions, and a number of developing countries, including major emerging economies, agreed to implement nationally appropriate mitigation actions and to communicate their efforts every two years.

Countries also agreed on the importance of acting to Reduce emissions from Deforestation and forest Degradation (REDD), and to provide support for the most vulnerable to cope with climate change.

To support these priorities, countries pledged up to $30 billion a year for developing countries between 2010 and 2012, to be disbursed through a Copenhagen Green Climate Fund.

Countries also backed the goal of mobilizing $100 billion a year by 2020.

Environmental facts from the UNEP

  • Forests cover 30 percent of the planet’s total land area. The total forested area in 2005 was just under 4 billion hectares, at least one third less than before the dawn of agriculture, some 10,000 years ago.
  • The ten most forest-rich countries, which account for two-thirds of the total forested area, are the Russian Federation, Brazil, Canada, the United States, China, Australia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Indonesia, Peru and India.
  • Six million hectares of primary forest are lost every year due to deforestation and modification through selective logging and other human interventions. More than one-third of all forests are primary forests, defined as forests where there are no clearly visible indications of human activity and where ecological processes are not significantly disturbed.
  • Primary forests shelter diverse animal and plant species, and culturally diverse indigenous people, with deep connections to their habitat.
  • Only 20 per cent of the world’s forests remain in large intact areas. These forests consist of tropical rain forests, mangrove, coastal and swamp forests. Monsoon and deciduous forests flourish in the drier and more mountainous regions.
  • Trees quite literally form the foundations of many natural systems. They help to conserve soil and water, control avalanches, prevent desertification, protect coastal areas and stabilize sand dunes.
  • Forests are the most important repositories of terrestrial biological biodiversity, housing up to 90 per cent of known terrestrial species.
  • Forest animals have a vital role in forest ecology such as pollination, seed dispersal and germination.
  • Trees absorb carbon dioxide and are vital carbon sinks.
  • It is estimated that the world’s forests store 283 Gigatonnes of carbon in their biomass alone, and that carbon stored in forest biomass, deadwood, litter and soil together is roughly 50 per cent more than the carbon in the atmosphere.
  • Carbon in forest biomass decreased in Africa, Asia and South America in the period 1990–2005. For the world as a whole, carbon stocks in forest biomass decreased annually by 1.1 Gigatonne of carbon (equivalent to 4 billion 25kg sacks of charcoal).
  • The loss of natural forests around the world contributes more to global emissions each year than the transport sector.
  • World population currently stands at 6.5 billion people. It is projected to grow to 9 billion by 2042.  The expansion of agricultural and industrial needs, population growth, poverty, landlessness and consumer demand are the major driving forces behind deforestation.
  • Most deforestation is due to conversion of forests to agricultural land. Global removals of wood for timber and fuel amounted to 3.1 billion cubic metres in 2005.
  • Worldwide, deforestation continues at an alarming rate, about 13 million hectares per year, an area the size of Greece or Nicaragua.
  • Africa and South America have the largest net loss of forests. In Africa it is estimated that nearly half of the forest loss was due to removal of wood fuel.
  • Forests in Europe are expanding. Asia, which had a net loss in the 1990s, reported a net gain of forests in the past five years, primarily due to large-scale forestation in China.
  • Eighty per cent of the world’s forests are publicly owned, but private ownership is on the rise, especially in North and Central America and in Oceania.
  • About 11 per cent of the world’s forests are designated for the conservation of biological diversity. These areas are mainly, but not exclusively, in protected areas.
  • Around 10 million people are employed in conventional forest management and conservation. Formal employment in forestry declined by about 10 per cent from 1990 to 2000.

The theme for the celebration is “Ozone layer protection: governance and compliance at their best”.  Governments world over are encouraged to create programs or events to raise public awareness of the importance of protecting the ozone layer for present and future generations. These can include workshops, press conferences, competitions in schools, and university lectures by experts. The list of programs as conducted by different countries will be listed on the UNEP website.

Check out how countries world over are celebrating the World Ozone Day HERE

Sources for details – UNEP website

This is the symbolic representation of a ton of CO2 from the Copenhagen summit of 2009.

Check out Seal the Deal – website of the 2009 December UN Climate change meeting in Copenhagen

Global FootPrint Network: Keeping Tabs On Our Consumption

August 21st was EarthOvershoot Day! Wondering what that means? So did I. That is when I found this organization “Global Footprint network”.

So what is the Global footprint? In articles about reducing consumption we have all come across the term Carbon Foot print; when that is taken to a global scale it becomes the Global footprint for all inhabitants of our planet.

Every year, Global Footprint Network calculates nature’s supply in the form of biocapacity, the amount of resources the planet generates, and compares that to human demand: the amount it takes to produce all the living resources we consume and absorb our carbon dioxide emissions. Earth Overshoot Day, a concept devised by U.K.-based new economics foundation, marks the day when demand on ecological services begins to exceed the renewable supply.

This year August 21st is the day on which we exhausted our ecological budget for the year, with 4 months remaining in the year.

How is Earth Overshoot day Calculated?

Earth Overshoot Day shows the day on which our total Ecological Footprint (measured in global hectares) is equal to the biocapacity (also measured in global hectares) that nature can regenerate in that year. For the rest of the year, we are accumulating debt by depleting our natural capital and letting waste accumulate.

[ world biocapacity / world Ecological Footprint ] x 365 = Earth Overshoot Day Day

What is Happening?

As with everything else in the environment being aware and reducing consumption and waste will go a long way in reducing our impact on the environment. Global climate change is one of humanity’s greatest challenges; addressing it is key to our long-term well-being and the continued vitality of our societies.

I had a conversation with my friend about program on NatGeo about Human population explosion and how that could lead to chaos due to inadequacies of resources vs. population… Scary but possible unless Governments world over pay heed to the burgeoning population in its urban centers. In 2008 according to data collected most number of people worldwide were residing in urban areas; their populations were calculated to be around 6.6 Billion and this was estimated to grow by 1.5Billion by 2030! Our role in shaping the Earth is powerful, and the human footprint continues to expand.

What Can Be Done?

The Global Footprint Network aims at creating a world where everyone can live well, within the means of one planet, and it is going to take all of us pulling together toward this common goal.

The scale of our challenge is enormous. Nothing short of a revolution in our economies, societies, energy choices and lifestyles is required.

At Global Footprint Network our programs are designed to influence decision makers at all levels of society and to create a critical mass of powerful institutions using the Footprint to put an end to ecological overshoot and get our economies back into balance.
Check out this video on the importance of ecological footprints

Check out your Ecological Footprint here very interesting almost like an FB game! This is my Ecological Footprint! 4.7 planets is everyone lived like me!!

And you come away with the knowledge of what each of your actions cost.

Keep in mind we are already accruing a debt this year, be conscious of your consumption.

Live Green!

Sources:

Global Footprint Network

World Governments Fail to Deliver on Biodiversity Promises

Suggested Reading from Amazon:

Our Ecological Footprint: Reducing Human Impact on the Earth (New Catalyst Bioregional Series) (Paperback)

Sharing Nature’s Interest : Ecological Footprints as an Indicator of Sustainability

National Geographic’s List Of 10 Things To Save The Ocean

National Geographic has a list of 10 things which each and everyone of us can adapt and which will help in saving our oceans!You can read the deatiled list HERE A pictorial representation of the tips is below 🙂

1. Mind our Carbon Footprint and Reduce Energy Consumption

2. Make Sustainable Educated Seafood Choices

3. Use Fewer Plastic Products

4. Help keep Beaches Clean, the trash on the beach invariably makes it to the Ocean

5. Don’t purchase products that exploit Marine Life.

6. Be An Ocean Friendly Pet owner – choosing pet food and litter responsibly. Also being aware of what fish to buy for your aquarium.

7. Support Organizations Working to Protect the Ocean

8. Influence Change in Your Community. VOTE – GREEN

9. Travel the Ocean Responsibly

10. Educate Yourself About Oceans and Marine Life
All life on Earth is connected to the ocean and its inhabitants.

Check out this Video from the BBC about the threat faced by the shallow waters and the Coral Reefs:

The First EV Charging Station In North America

Edit August 18th 2010 – CORRECTION AS NOTED BY PGE – This is the first quick-charge station for electric vehicles in North America. There is already an established and growing network of standard charging stations in the Portland, Oregon area.

Oregon is for all practical purposes the Greenest state in the US and now it has the first Electrical charging station! I read in an Engadget.com article by Thomas Ricker that Oregon is touted to be where the most number of electric cars will make its debut. The charging station is located in the campus of Portland General Electric (PGE) in Downtown Portland and they are charging $3 for parking and the “Charging” is free to use as long as the automobile has a PGE sticker on it. The Takasago charging station manufactured by the NEC corporation can charge a Lithium Ion battery to almost full power in 20-30 minutes i.e. the time for a coffee break.

I have had this question in my mind about it being the first charging station, which is again based on a news bit from 2 years ago for Lake Oswego Oregon, a town outside of Portland where PGE had installed curbside charging stations in 2008. Read the article here just got me wondering whether they took it all down in the last couple of years, as this is now called the first one in North America.

The New charging station was inaugurated by Governor Ted Kulongoski,by charging a Nissan Leaf which he took for a drive and also put down a reservation for the Leaf. There are plans to install more than 2000 EV charging stations across the country, this is the first step in that journey.Looks like the EV’s will be on our roads soon.

Check out a video of the EV charging station on viddler

Check out the following articles for more details:

The was this article in Oregon live in 2008 about PGE charging stations in Oswego Lake just outside Portland, wondering what happened to it? Read the article here

The Oregon Live has a detailed article read it HERE

You can read the entire article on Engadget here

An article on inhabitat here

The Sun Lights Up Dallas Pathways At Night

Lea Bogdan had covered this new green building in Dallas downtown called the 17seventeen on the inhabitat website and I wondered what was the new lighting she was referring to. So I thought about taking a closer look at it.  No, it is not moon light and it is not your usual solar garden lights on stakes either, Solar Cynergy a company based in Norco California has a series of lights which can be integrated into the flooring thus lighting up pathways during the night. They are manufacturers of architectural solar lighting for residences, developments and cities. Looking at the product I think it could be called a solar brick light or something, as the encased light does resemble kind of a brick with its thickness and sturdiness.

Rectangular lights

The units come in 3 shapes: circular, square and rectangular shaped. The units also come in 5 colors: Blue,Green, White, Halogen White and Red. The units are all self contained and get charged by sun-light during the day. The units are removed from view and embedded beneath a scratch-resistant polycarbonate resin surface, the solar panels cycle power to a capacitor that charges during the day and automatically illuminates the LEDs at nightfall via a photosensor.

Solar Cynergy specifies that the lights need a full day of sunlight exposure before it can start lighting up the night. These lights can be integrated into the floor or walls where they will be exposed to direct sunlight. These lights which are of the top most quality do not come cheap it is priced from around 900$ for a 6pack of the round lights to around 2000$ for the rectangular lights 6pack.

The incorporated lighting really adds to the building’s architecture visually and also is a very green idea put into use in a large scale setup. Aesthetically and environmentally the solar pavers make a lot of sense. Check out the pictures below and follow the links below for more details.

Read the Full article on Inhabitat here

Check out Solar Cynergy website here or their blog here

A video I found on youtube showing the lights a little more clearly check it out:

You can check out the prices at the links below which will take you to Amazon.com or look for a retailer here

Square Blue Solar Light 6 pk

Rectangular Blue Solar Light 6 pack

gDiaper Earth Friendly Diapers: An Eco-Friendly Choice

My little niece is almost 2 and she goes through 3-4 diapers a day now! When she was a baby the numbers used to be much higher and my sister was always looking for an alternative which made sense economically and environmentally. She has used cloth diapers as a replacement and what we discovered was it made better sense environmentally to use the disposable kind as the cloth one actually created a larger carbon footprint than the disposable one!!(Check out the video at the end of the post you will be surprised at what you learn!)

My mom says it gives parents a pass to take their time to potty train their little ones, she says in her childhood with out the security of the diaper most kids were potty trained by the time they were walking! Cloth diaper manufacturers do claim their users are potty trained a year earlier than disposable diaper users.

Disposable diapers made there appearance in various forms in the early part of the 20th century. In 1949 Johnson & Johnson introduced the first mass produced disposable diapers in the US. Since then it has become a staple in every babies life growing up. The US diaper industry is valued at 3.2Billion dollars annually; which amounts to around 18billion diapers which head to the landfill every year! Each one has an outer layer of waterproof polypropylene and an inner layer of fluff made from wood pulp plus super-slurper sodium polyacrylate (SAP) that can hold a hundred times its weight in water.

Those 18 billion diapers add up to 82,000 tons of plastic a year (want to calculate the amount of crude oil??) and 1.3 million tons of wood pulp — 250,000 trees. After a few hours of active service these materials are trucked away, primarily to landfills, where they sit, neatly wrapped packages of excrement, entombed undegraded for several hundred years. In raw form sewage is illegal in land fills, some how with diapers it is kind of over looked too!

World over all countries now have access to the disposable diaper which is seen as a boon to new parents who then don’t have to worry about leaks and mishaps. Approximately 50million diapers are said to be ending up in waste dumps world!

The Great Disposable Diaper Debate from the Sustainability Institute makes for very interesting reading.

gDiaper the Green Diaper

Anyways coming to the Earth friendly diaper The gDiaper The most eco-friendly diaper available, gDiapers provides parents with a diapering solution that is good for babies, parents and the planet. You can have the flexibility of a disposable diaper with a 100% biodegradable gRefill, or opt for re-usability with super soft and trim-fitting gCloth inserts.

What makes them special?

  • g stands for green diapers. gDiapers are breathable, 100% biodegradable diapers you can flush, compost or toss. gDiapers are designed to keep your baby dry and comfortable and the planet a little happier.
  • Home compost, toss, or flush the biodegradable gRefill for the smallest footprint on earth. gDiapers break down in 50-150 days.
  • gDiapers are plastic-free, elemental chlorine free, latex free, and perfume free.
  • Comes in 2 options – Choose from two guilt-free options: biodegradable diapers with our biodegradable gRefills or reusable cloth diapers with our gCloth inserts.
  • The company also has machine washable and colorful diaper covers which they call gPants to use with the gDiapers.

The gpants which are 92% cotton, 8% spandex, no elemental chlorine, no perfumes, no latex and no guilt, comes in 3 sizes small, medium and large – priced at 101$ for a pack of 6 and are on sale now for$70.00

The grefills and diaper cloths are priced from 15-30$ depending on the size and number of pieces in a packet.

A really Cute g Pant

I find the product very interesting and am recommending it to my sister, it is nice to start a Green life style real early, and cotton am sure should be much more comfortable for my little niece 🙂 What do you think? Live Green!

Source for Pictures and Information on gDiapers, refills etc >> www.gdiapers.com

A Very Interesting and educative Video about the impact of Diapers on the environment from the National Geographic Do check it out 🙂