Tag Archives: Solar Water Desalination

Portable Solar Desalination From MIT

Clean drinking water is a necessity for human survival. MIT researchers have come up with a mobile solar powered water desalination system which could help remote regions have access to clean water.

The Project

This graphic shows the team’s concept for a portable system that could be shipped to disaster zones.

The team consists of 3 Mechanical Engineering graduate students Amy Bilton (Cyprus Program Fellow), Leah Kelley (Presidential Fellow), Richard Heller MS Student, led by Steven Dubowsky, a professor in both the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and Prof. Richard Wiesman.

Funded by MIT’s Center for Clean Water and Clean Energy in collaboration with the King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM), the research is aimed at designing small-scale systems for remote regions that don’t have access to vast amounts of electricity. The systems are also designed so that they can be cost-effectively assembled from standard parts and put into operation within hours using local human capital.

The team has built a working prototype that “is capable of producing 80 gallons of water a day in a variety of weather conditions.”

They estimate a larger version that could provide about 1000 gallons of water per day would cost about $8000 to construct. Size wise they believe a C-130 Cargo plane could deliver 2dozen desalination units, thereby providing enough drinking water for 10,000 people.

The supply of energy and clean water to remote locations, such as desert facilities, farming operations, resorts, and small villages in the developing world can be logistically complex and expensive. This project explores the feasibility, design and control of small smart power units to provide clean water and energy to remote sites by using solar power and reverse osmosis modules.

Watch the video about the product –

Opinion

When disasters strike basic necessities like drinking water made available sooner makes recovery faster and manageable. For remote locations too this might be a viable alternative as a fresh water source provided the solar panels becomes viable cost wise.

Read the full article HERE

For more details on the Project check their Website